Impactful Design at a Glance: "Analyzing Feasibility"

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June 16, 2021

This is the second in a series to provide an overview of the five phases of AgResults’ approach to Pay-for-Results prize competition design. You can find the first blog post here. For more information about the entire process, check out the full design toolkit that was published in February 2021.

Have an idea for a Pay-for-Results prize competition but looking for a proven way to gauge its feasibility?

We are pleased to share our “Analyzing Feasibility” design brief, the second in a series of five briefs that summarize AgResults’ approach to designing Pay-for-Results prize competitions. In this brief (linked here), we explain how program designers can analyze a prize concept’s viability to assess if it has merit to proceed to a prize structuring phase.

By researching relevant market systems, designers can articulate a Theory of Change to project how a prize competition can achieve systemic change. Focusing on target beneficiaries, government and donor activities, and key private sector actors can also help designers reasonably estimate impacts for the proposed competition to decide whether to proceed with its implementation.

Keep an eye out for the third design brief on “Structuring Prizes” that will be published soon!

Type of Post: Blog

June 16, 2021

This is the second in a series to provide an overview of the five phases of AgResults’ approach to Pay-for-Results prize competition design. You can find the first blog post here. For more information about the entire process, check out the full design toolkit that was published in February 2021.

Have an idea for a Pay-for-Results prize competition but looking for a proven way to gauge its feasibility?

We are pleased to share our “Analyzing Feasibility” design brief, the second in a series of five briefs that summarize AgResults’ approach to designing Pay-for-Results prize competitions. In this brief (linked here), we explain how program designers can analyze a prize concept’s viability to assess if it has merit to proceed to a prize structuring phase.

By researching relevant market systems, designers can articulate a Theory of Change to project how a prize competition can achieve systemic change. Focusing on target beneficiaries, government and donor activities, and key private sector actors can also help designers reasonably estimate impacts for the proposed competition to decide whether to proceed with its implementation.

Keep an eye out for the third design brief on “Structuring Prizes” that will be published soon!